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NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual

Chapter 4 Fuel Units and Oil Valves Chapter 4—Fuel Units and Oil Valves 4-17 chamber cover bolts and remove the cover and slide out the strainer. Whenever you take the cover off the strainer, be sure to scrape off the old gasket between the cover and unit body and replace it with the proper replacement gasket. Some Webster pumps have no strainers, but they do contain chopper gears that clean the oil and the cover should be removed on a routine basis and cleaned out. Make sure you have the proper gasket before you do this. Clean the pump strainer screen in heating oil or kerosene and reassemble, making sure to tighten all cover bolts evenly to prevent distortion of the cover. When putting the burner back into service, be sure to bleed the air from the system and check for proper flame cutoff. Remember that the strainer is a secondary filter and that a proper installation also has an external or primary filter. Pump gaskets It is also important that the correct gasket be used. Using incorrect gaskets can damage the pump. Noise problems in fuel units, oil lines or tanks Noise generated as a result of pump operation, or noise transmitted by oil lines, is annoying to the customer and should be eliminated. Pump noise: In addition to noise created by worn internal parts in the pump, misalignment of the fuel unit and motor coupling shaft or loose installation bolts may be the source of noise problems. All fittings and bolts should be tightened securely. Oil line noise is the result of improperly fastened oil lines which are allowed to vibrate against surrounding objects such as sheet metal furnace covers, duct work, etc. If oil line noise is a result of noise transmitted from the fuel unit, check the anti-hum device in the pump. The return line on two pipe systems may occasionally provide line noises. If the suction and return lines touch each other they can create line noise. Tank noise: This is not a common source of noise complaints. If such a complaint should develop, the cause can normally be traced back to transmission of noise by the oil lines. Tank noise can also be eliminated in many cases by a hum eliminator. A commonly overlooked source of tank noise is improper installation of the return line. The end of the return line of a two pipe system should be located approximately 3" above the bottom of the tank. This will permit discharge of return oil to be at a point beneath the surface of the oil, thereby eliminating the noise of return oil falling into the tank. Potential leaks in oil lines Leaking suction and return lines can cause serious problems. We all must be ever vigilant for possible pipe leaks. • Treat every out of oil/automatic delivery as a potential leak that should be further investigated. • Study oil deliveries; further investigate each tank that takes more oil than projected. • Respond quickly to any calls from customers for oil smells and concerns about increased consumption. These can be early warning signs of trouble. • Treat every water-in-the-tank call as a potential tank leak that must be investigated.


NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual
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