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NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual

Chapter 3—Oil Tanks and Piping 3-11 Oil lines For normal residential use, 1/2" O.D. oil lines are recommended. Copper oil lines should be connected with flare fittings. Compression fittings must not be used (“slip fittings”, where the oil line enters the top of the tank, are the exception and are acceptable). Oil lines should have as few fittings as possible and all fittings should be accessible. Thermal shutoff valves Indoor tanks should have a thermal safety shutoff (Firomatic®) valve in the suction line at the tank, see Figure 3-17. Outside tanks should have a shut off valve where the suction line enters the inside of the building. Filters An oil filter should be installed in the suction line. See Figure 3-18. Plug or cap Plastic or metal plugs are used to keep water and debris out of a new tank during shipment and storage. They must be removed and discarded during installation and any unused tank openings must be plugged with threaded steel plugs. Tank inspection procedures Oil tanks should be inspected on a regular basis so that potential problems can be discovered and corrected before they affect tank longevity and system performance. NORA recommends three levels of inspection—an initial inspection performed before a delivery is made to a new tank or a new customer; a routine inspection performed during routine maintenance or tune-ups; and brief, pre-delivery inspection each time the tank is filled. 1.) Initial inspections and evaluations NORA recommends that all tanks should be inspected and approved for delivery before the first delivery to a new customer or a new tank. An initial inspection provides the opportunity to notice flaws in the tank, not reported by the customer, which may Figure 3-18: Oil filter installed in suction line Figure 3-17: Thermal safety shutoff valve Chapter 3 Oil Tanks and Piping


NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual
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