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NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual

Chapter 3—Oil Tanks and Piping 3-5 Following manufacturer’s instructions when installing new tanks and performing the inspection procedures described at the end of this Chapter, you will greatly reduce the amount of water-related problems and extend the lives of your customers’ tanks. Properly installed and maintained tanks can last for several decades—much longer than most equipment in the home. However, like everything else, tanks eventually need to be replaced. Installation considerations When it is time to install a new or replacement tank—answer these three questions: • What size tank will be best? • Where is the best place to install it? • What type of tank will be best? Size Although large tanks are often installed for delivery efficiency, an oversized tank can cause service problems—such as: • Poor fuel quality—fuel oil has a shelf life and deteriorates over time. • Corrosion—larger tanks usually build up more water from condensation. On the other hand, tanks that are too small require frequent deliveries, leading to problems during peak delivery season. In general, the right size tank is one that holds about one-third (1/3) of the customer’s annual consumption. Therefore, a customer who uses 900 gallons of oil a year should have a 275 or 330-gallon tank. (900/3 = 300) There may be special situations that require you to install a tank that is either larger or smaller, but in general, it is best to apply the 1/3 rule when possible. Location There are three possible locations for a tank installation: 1. Inside a building—usually in the basement, utility room or garage 2. Outside, above–ground 3. Outside, underground Before selecting a tank location, be sure to consider regulations regarding setbacks from: • Heating equipment and other ignition sources • Property lines • Buildings, doors, windows, vents and air intakes • Meters Also remember to locate the tank where: • The delivery vehicle can safely park during filling • It will be accessible for inspection and servicing • An oil release will not easily enter a drain, well or waterway • It will not be exposed to corrosion and/or damage from dripping water, falling ice, vehicles, etc. Inside tanks NORA recommends above ground, indoor tank installations whenever possible. These installations offer a number of advantages over outside tanks, including: • The oil is usually warmer, which means it burns better and won’t gel or have cold weather performance problems. Chapter 3 Oil Tanks and Piping


NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual
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