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NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual

3-4 Oil Tanks and Piping sion, Figure 3-2, is to eliminate the water at the bottom of the tank. Removing the water is just the beginning. You must also determine how the water got into the tank and take corrective steps to prevent water from building up again. Figure 3-3. The most common causes of water in tanks are: • Condensation • Broken tank gauges (outside tank) • Loose or missing fill and vent caps • Pumping oil from an old tank into a new tank • Failing to drain water from a tank before installation. Condensation can be greatly reduced by installing tanks indoors or in an enclosure. If a tank is located outside, you can reduce condensation by painting it a light color and protecting it from direct sunlight. Gauges and caps should be inspected regularly and replaced when necessary. Figure 3-1: Various layers of material in the tank Figure 3-2: Internal corrosion with pin hole magnified sion to occur at the tank bottom, there needs to be bacteria and water in the tank, see Figure 3-1. The bacteria live at the oil/water interface; they “eat” the oil and create a substance that, when mixed with water, creates an acid that corrodes the metal in the tank. The best way to reduce internal corro- Figure 3-3: Bacterial “Bug Tracks” Chapter 3 Oil Tanks and Piping


NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual
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