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NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual

can’t keep. If you tell a customer you are going to do something—do it. As a service technician, your job usually requires keeping promises made to customers by your company. The most common promises are appointment times for service calls. Your customers want to know exactly when you are coming to their home. You have to communicate with your dispatcher so he/she can judge the arrival times for your future calls. The ultimate beneficiary of good communications and accurate promises is the service technician. Isn’t it nicer to work for a customer who is delighted that you arrived on time rather than one who is angry because you are late? If, for some reason, you find that you must break a promise, do it as quickly as possible. The sooner you give your customer the bad news, the less they will be inconvenienced. Moments of truth It is helpful to think of customer relations in terms of “Moments of Truth.” Every time you come in contact with a customer, you have a chance to make either a good or a bad impression. Each customer contact is a onetime opportunity to distinguish yourself from the competition. Successful customer relations mean making all the “Moments of Truth” good ones. If the service provider gets it wrong, they may be erasing all memories of good treatment. If they get it right, they can undo all the mistakes that happened before. You can make all of your moments of truth good ones by being patient, understanding and professional. If there is a problem, you need to acknowledge it and apologize for the inconvenience. Be sure to use your customer’s name, confirm you are listening, and if authorized, give the customer a choice in the resolution. THE GOLDEN RULE: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you the first time. It means being helpful, friendly, thoughtful, tactful, and polite. As you know, customer service is a unique and challenging profession. You are often the only link a customer has with your company. The few moments you spend with a customer is all it takes for them to form an opinion—good or bad—about your company. What you say and how you say it, will determine if the customer stays or goes. It also determines if they tell their friends good things about your company—or bad things. It’s a relationship Your company’s relationship with your customers is very close. Many of your customers will buy from your company for as long as they live in their homes. Naturally, they expect more than a “take the money and run attitude”—they expect your company to keep its promises. Customer disappointment is usually based on bad customer relations rather than bad technology. They won’t leave if the burner breaks, but they will leave if you let them down by not fixing the problem or failing to let them know what is happening. Many technicians tend to take complaints personally and then feel a need to defend themselves. It’s important to remember that the customer usually isn’t upset with you; they’re upset with the situation. To the customer, the service call is an interruption and many of them have to adjust their schedules, miss work and lose wages just to wait for their system to be repaired. Keep promises Breaking promises is the fastest way to lose a customer. Never make a promise you Chapter 17 Customer Service 17-4 Customer Service


NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual
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