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NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual

• Length of piping system • Degree of thermal insulation • Temperature of the air (or other material) surrounding the pipes Warm air ducts Ducts that distribute heated air to the house lose heat in two ways. • Heat flows from the heated duct walls to the colder surroundings • Heated air escapes from leaky duct joints Both of these losses reduce the useful heat delivered to the house and increase fuel consumption. Many warm air ducts pass through unheated areas, such as attics or crawl spaces. Because of the cooler surroundings, heat loss into these areas is large. Inspect all warm air ducts for leaks and proper insulation. Use seamless insulated ducts on new installations. Expected energy savings Boiler Piping: Insulating piping may save 5-10 percent. Warm Air Ducts: Insulation and sealing leaks may save up to 40 percent. Heating systems tune-up Periodic cleaning and adjustment of all heating systems assures the highest level of efficiency, safety, and fewest service calls. Service routines save fuel and prevents equipment breakdowns that are a nuisance to both homeowners and service departments. See Chapter 14 for more details on proper tune-up procedures. You may wish to develop a checklist to be filled out during each tune-up. Good service procedures involve a number of steps that include (but are not limited to): Chapter 16 Energy Conservation Service routines save fuel and prevents equipment breakdowns that are a nuisance to both homeowners and service departments. • Visually inspecting the entire heating system • Performing a combustion efficiency test; be sure to check the draft drop through the heat exchanger by comparing the draft over fire and at the breach. • Vacuum cleaning of all heating surfaces including the boiler or furnace flue passages (when required). • Checking to be sure the flue pipe and chimney flue are clear and in good condition • Cleaning all burner parts including the air fan and housing, ignition electrodes, and burner head. • Replacing fuel and air filters. • Sealing air leaks around the burner and heat exchanger. • Using combustion test equipment to measure efficiency. • Adjusting the burner for high efficiency and low smoke number. • Modifying system and readjusting until peak efficiency is obtained. • Recording final combustion efficiency for tuned system. • Checking all combustion safety controls. Heating system tune-ups reduce on-cycle flue heat loss and assure good long-term efficiency. Reduced excess combustion air lowers flue heat loss and low smoke settings avoid soot accumulations and Chapter 16—Energy Conservation 16-15


NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual
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