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NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual

an immaculately clean tank. Also, sludge is corrosive. Untreated sludge can attack the steel filter housing, causing pinhole leaks. The answers to sludge fouling of filters is good housekeeping throughout the distribution system, keeping water out of tanks, and removing existing water. In problem jobs, the use of an effective sludgecontrol additive may be required. If you treat an already fouled system with an effective sludge dispersant, tiny dark particles are released from the biofilm as it breaks down. These particles are similar to those that result from fuel instability. Unstable fuel is usually dark in color— burgundy cherry to coffee colored. In both cases, the double filter system described above seems to the best answer. Replacing the oil filter element Cartridge type filter—shut off the oil then loosen the nut on the top of the filter head and lower the can from the head. (Use caution; the can is full of oil.) Remove the element and the gasket and clean inside the canister. Inspect the old element. Excessive sludge or evidence of water calls for action. Check the inside of the can for pitting and rust. Install the new element and new gaskets, reassemble, open the oil valve, and bleed the air out of the filter through the bleeder. Spin-on type—shut off the oil and using a filter wrench, loosen and spin off the oil cartridge. Cut and remove the old center stud “O” ring and replace it with a new “O” ring. Remove the outside filter gasket on the new filter and apply a thin coat of petroleum jelly to both sides of the gasket. Carefully replace the filter gasket. Fill the cartridge with clean oil and spin it onto the filter head. Bleed the air from the filter. Chapter 2 Heating Oil Steps to Better Fuel Performance Before removing the fill cap for a buried tank, the driver must be sure water, dirt, snow or ice cannot fall into the tank. After delivery, drivers should check gaskets and O-rings if needed on the fill cap to be sure they are in good shape, reinstall the fill cap, and make certain it is sealed tight. While making a delivery, the driver should check to be sure the vent cap is in place, there is no water around the fill, the vent pipe is solid, and there is no water in tank. On above ground outdoor tanks: are the tank legs stable on a solid foundation? Are there signs of rust, weeps, wet spots, deep scratches, or dents on the tank surface, oil leaks, or signs of spills, and does the tank need painting? Sampling of tank bottoms should be done routinely (during the tune-up) for cleanliness and lack of water. If excessive sludge and water are found, they should be removed as soon as possible. Hold up on deliveries to problem tanks until the sludge and water problem is solved. Once the sludge and water are removed from the tank: fill the tank with kerosene or specially treated fuel, tune-up the burner, hand-pump the oil lines thoroughly, then replace the filter, strainer, and nozzle. Schedule a follow-up call a month later to see to it that the tank and lines remain clean. The tank’s fill boxes, fill pipes, vent caps and pipes and remote fills should be checked for cracks and leaks on every delivery and tune-up. Often the problem is a hole in the vent pipe just below ground level. Dig a few inches of soil away from the vent to check for rusting. If the fill box is in a driveway, it should be a “mushroomtype” fill box with a watertight gasket rather than a metal-to-metal fit. When additives are used, they should be added before filling the tank, if possible, to facilitate proper mixing. 2-12 Heating Oil and Its Properties


NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual
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