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NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual

Equipment integrity Typically, you may replace certain failed parts (nozzles and filters); look for and correct potential problems; lubricate motors; and check controls. Cleanliness Unfortunately, most of the work you do during a tune-up is not visible to the customer. An important part of every tune-up is to make sure that what the customer does see—the outside of the unit and the area around it—are neat and clean when you’ve finished. By focusing on these four factors during the tune-up, you will save your customer money by minimizing their fuel consumption and help to avoid the inconvenience of an oilburner breakdown during the heating season. Tools of the trade To successfully perform a tune-up, your truck must have certain tools, instruments, Chapter 14 Preventative Maint./Tuneups 14-4 Preventative Maintenance Tune-ups parts, and supplies. You need to have at least the following: A complete set of hand tools including: • Standard wrenches— depending on the type of burners you service, these can be standard, metric or both. At a minimum, you will want to have a set of 1/4" through 3/4" standard open and box wrenches. • Adjustable wrenches—an eight-inch and a ten-inch handle adjustable wrench. • Socket wrench kit—1/4" to 3/4". • Pliers—groove joint pliers (commonly called water-pumps or channel locks), linesman pliers, locking pliers (Vise Grips®) and needle nose pliers. • Allen wrenches (hex keys)— a standard set. • Screwdrivers—an assortment of slotted and phillips heads. • Nut drivers—3/16", 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2". • Wire cutter and stripper. • Tubing cutters—3/4" regular and mini. • Flaring tool. • Flash light with spare batteries. • Drop light. • Jumper leads with insulated alligator clips. • Tape measure—12' minimum. • Drill and drill bits. Wiping down the boiler jacket Keep your tools neat in your truck


NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual
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