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NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual

Chapter 9 Ignition Systems Chapter 9—Ignition Systems 9-3 Introduction The completely automatic electric ignition system is an important part of oilburner technology. There are two different main components used for ignition systems on oilburners: the ignition transformer and the solid state ignitor. The ignition transformer is a step-up transformer using copper windings around an iron core. It steps up the incoming voltage of 120 volts to an output voltage of 10,000 volts. This is accomplished by a 90 to 1 primary to secondary winding ratio around the iron core. The solid state ignitor utilizes electronics to produce an output voltage of anywhere from 14,000 to 20,000 volts peak. Both components supply this high voltage electricity to the electrodes. A spark jumps from the tip of one electrode to the tip of the other. The electrical arc then ignites the atomized oil. Let’s examine the various components of the ignition system shown in Figure 9-1. The voltage travels from the transformer or ignitor through the ignition cables, buss bars, or spring clips to the electrodes which are held in place by the ceramic insulators (porcelains). When it reaches the tips of the electrodes it jumps the gap between them, creating our spark. Figure 9-1: Ignition system components Ignition Cable Electrode Bracket Ignition Electrode Ceramic Insulator Ignition Transformer Chapter 9 Ignition Systems


NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual
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