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NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual

CO ambient air testing (Combustion air zone & living space) Ambient CO levels should be checked and the equipment should be run through a complete cycle if you suspect any combustion problems. If at any time ambient CO levels exceed 100 ppm, evacuate occupants and call emergency services. The most common sources of CO are exhaust from a vehicle in an attached garage, and depressurization of the home resulting in insufficient air for combustion. If CO is detected, all possible sources of CO should be checked, including—but not limited to—water heaters, gas ovens and stoves, the furnace, (non-electric) space heaters, and vented or unvented appliances such as gas logs. Combustion efficiency testing Combustion efficiency testing is one of the most important things we do when servicing oilburners, Figure 7-6. The tests determine the quality of the combustion process and tell us if we have set up the burner correctly. In this section, we will explore how to use instruments to measure and improve efficiency, cleanliness, and safety of the unit. We will also cover the reasons for high and low efficiency, and how testing can pinpoint current and future problems. It is imperative to perform a combustion analysis during routine service, or any time changes are made that will affect combustion. Combustion testing provides numerous benefits to the customer and service technician including: • Saving money • Saving time • Avoiding callbacks • Limiting liability • Maintaining equipment warranty • Providing confidence • Providing increased comfort • Providing increased safety • Increasing energy efficiency • Lowering environmental emissions Modern burners require proper setup, making the use of instruments necessary. Using instruments assures low smoke and soot, improves your image, and increases customer comfort and satisfaction. Today’s burners are superior to the older models when set up correctly—but can be troublesome when setup incorrectly. You cannot see a #2 smoke, you also cannot feel a 350° stack, smell a 6% CO2, or 100 ppm of carbon monoxide, yet if you leave the unit operating in any of these conditions, you will not be doing your job. With the older units, you could observe the flame, see its shape and color, and determine to some extent how the burner was performing. However, even with the Chapter 7—Combustion 7-9 Figure 7-6: Combustion efficiency test Chapter 7 Combustion


NORA Oilheat Technicians Manual
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